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Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914

On 4 July 1914 Mercedes celebrated a triumphant one-two-three victory in the French Grand Prix by Christian Lautenschlager, Louis Wagner and Otto Salzer. The race was held over a 37.6-kilometre circuit south of Lyon.

The vehicle entered by the Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft was its newly developed Grand Prix racing car. Some 20 laps over the tricky course, or a good 750 kilometres, were the order of the day, and Mercedes was up against a fierce competition – above all from Peugeot and Delage from France, Sunbeam from England and Fiat from Italy.

Theodor Pilette and Max Sailer were forced to retire with technical problems, but Christian Lautenschlager, Louis Wagner and Otto Salzer took the remaining cars on to finish the race at the front of the field after more than seven hours: the first one-two-three victory in the history of motorsport had been achieved.

The regulations limited engine displacement to 4.5 litres. The Mercedes Grand Prix racing car featured a completely redesigned four-cylinder engine with an overhead camshaft and two intake and two exhaust valves per cylinder – making this the first Mercedes engine to make use of four-valve technology. The racing engine delivered a peak output of 78 kW (106 hp) at a - quite literally - revolutionary 3100 rpm

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Wallpapers : Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914 (click on image to enlarge)

Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914 Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914 Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914 Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914
Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914 Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914   Mercedes Grand Prix racing car 1914

 

 

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